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Using human insights to improve experiences beyond devices

| July 5, 2018
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Recently, UserTesting sponsored the CXPA Atlanta Networking Team’s quarterly event, which was held at the Roebuck Room, in the unique Ponce City Market. 50 local business professionals enjoyed the opportunity to get an insider’s tour of the market’s facilities, then listen and learn from three panelists actively working on local projects.

The projects ranged from retail to healthcare to real estate, but the common thread was clear: the customer’s experience (or the patient’s, the visitor’s, the guest’s, etc.) must be carefully considered for the project to succeed.

Using feedback to make patient experiences more comfortable and accessible

For example, Amanda Mewborn from Piedmont Healthcare revealed that her team interviewed 543 patients during the planning stage of their new care tower building. These interviews informed a variety of improvements to their facility, such as sidewalks wide enough to accommodate two wheelchairs passing each other comfortably, eliminating the notion of “waiting rooms,” and including sofas in every patient room so that family members can enjoy greater comfort during a patient’s stay.

Designing workplaces for collaboration and convenience

Ponce City Market was also designed with the idea of abandoning waiting rooms in their office spaces, according to Thomas Sandlin of Jamestown LP. This real estate team is responsible for one of Atlanta’s signature shopping/retail/workplace/everything else locations. They consciously chose more open and transparent workplace designs to encourage collaboration among the employees who work there as well as the ability to meander downstairs for a local bite to eat without battling congested Atlanta traffic.

Improving pedestrian experiences

And traffic is getting thicker up in Alpharetta, too, where Kathi Cook and her team at the City of Alpharetta are revitalizing their Atlanta-adjacent suburb into a more modern destination. Foot traffic to the city’s new parks, restaurants, and other attractions has increased so much that she’s now working on pedestrian bridges and other ways of letting citizens on the road live more harmoniously.

CX has gone mainstream

What’s interesting is that these customer-based considerations are becoming easier for stakeholders to wrap their heads around. The notion of making major decisions based on the experience provided is landing and expanding. The questions CX professionals are now starting to ask are more tactical. Here are some that surfaced during the discussion:

  • We’re trying to listen to customers, but how do we temper the loudest voices in the conversation and make the best decision for the most people?
  • What are the common objections that get voiced when championing on behalf of customers, and what strategies can diffuse them?
  • How can we prove customer-centric ROI, especially early on, when there aren’t current CX metrics in place?
  • How do we get traditional-minded organizations and individuals to embrace the change to customer-centric decision making?

It was an invigorating conversation, and we made great local connections and learned about some of the CX commonalities that exist across industries. We’re looking forward to continuing the discussion so we can help you create great experiences—both digital and physical.

Want to learn more?

If you’d like to learn more about how UserTesting can help you understand your customers through on-demand human insights, contact us here.